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Thread: Aspiration procedure: BLOAT

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    Default Aspiration procedure: BLOAT

    This guide is in no way meant to replace proper veternary guidlines or procedures
    You would be required to first proper diagnose the bloat, then treatment with proper medication
    Below is an emergency guide and last resort, referenced from another websiteAspiration procedure:

    Supplies needed:

    Small gauge (25 to 30 gauge) 1/2 inch needle (e.g. TB or insulin syringe). The higher the gauge, the smaller and easier the needle is to use. A syringe, which holds 1cc, is easier to work with than a 0.5cc syringe.

    Paper towels soaked in froggy water

    Plain Neosporin ointment (without any pain relieving agents)

    Cotton swabYour frog with bloat can be aspirated as frequently as every day but performing the procedure every other day is a bit easier on the frog.

    Be sure to feed your frog sparingly in the future to help prevent the recurrence of bloat.

    If your frog developed bloat over a very short period of time, such as 1-3 days, a bacterial infection may be present, so treatment with Maracyn-Two according to the package directions might be helpful.

    In order to get a direct look at the internal organs of the abdomen, so that you can be sure to avoid them with the aspiration needle, use a very powerful small LED flashlight and press it against the side of the frog's belly (same side as you are aspirating from), while the frog is in the upside down position. Turn off the overhead lighting and the flashlight illuminates the belly, showing all the internal organs, which are to be avoided. Aspirate fluid as noted in the process in the earlier section of this article.

    We have had good success with this procedure but perform at your own risk
    Gloves - Latex or Nitrile glovesPlace the frog on its back (with its belly up) and place its body between dechlorinated/dechloraminated, same-temperatured, water-soaked paper towels like bed sheets. Expose the left lower portion of its belly and left leg. Tuck the frog's left leg up against the body and place your finger against the leg/flipper so that it cannot extend out. This also helps make the skin taut - causing the fluid to raise the skin up in the belly area and minimizes the chance of hitting vital organs during the procedure. Be gentle when holding the leg against the body so as not to damage the knee and make sure not to squeeze the frog too hard, as the pressure can damage them internally.

    It may help to have someone assist you but the procedure can be done alone. Insert the needle just below the skin and enter at a 45 degree angle. The needle shouldn't go in very far, just barely into the abdominal cavity, to minimize the chances of piercing a loop of bowel. Be careful not to hit any veins or visualized vital organsNote: Leave the left leg tucked under (rather than stretching it out as it is in the picture below). However, the needle placement pictured below is correctYou need to be patient and withdraw fluid at the rate of 0.1 cc every 20 seconds, removing up to 0.3cc of fluid total. In very extreme cases of bloat up to 0.5cc of fluid can be removed. Typically, do not remove more than 0.3cc fluid because removing too much fluid can cause a large difference in pressure between the belly fluid and the fluid in the blood vessels, leading to circulatory collapse.

    After withdrawing the fluid, remove the needle and dab the entry site with neosporin on the tip of a cotton swab to minimize the risk of infection.
    Put your frog back into his tank.

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Aspiration procedure: BLOAT

    Above info could be given to a VET who is not familiar with above procedures maybe watch and learn

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    Default Re: Aspiration procedure: BLOAT

    Thanks for the post. Very useful information for a vet not familiar with amphibians. Another good anti-bacterial topical is original Bactine (NOT the pain reliving cleanser). Not sure if it is available outside the U.S.

    Martin, D., and H. Hong. 1991. The use of Bactine in the treatment of open wounds and other lesions in captive anurans. Herpetol. Rev. 22:21.
    Terry Gampper
    Nebraska Herpetological Society




    “If we can discover the meaning in the trilling of a frog, perhaps we may understand why it is for us not merely noise but a song of poetry and emotion.”
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    Adrian Forsyth

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    Default Re: Aspiration procedure: BLOAT

    Any pictures of this procedure available?

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