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Thread: Interested in axolotls

  1. #1
    piiglet
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    Default Interested in axolotls

    I was given a 10 gallon by my parents for my bday - - it has been firmly stated that this is all I am allowed.

    I have access to matured media from my neighbor - - upon hearing about my tank they gave me a big lecture about the necessity of cycling, I then came on the net and furthered my research - - def going to only use matured media for the cycle.



    I have always been interested in axolotls - - looking online I am seeing mixed info and I don't generally trust fish store people.

    Some sites say 2 are fine in a standard 10 gallon - - my dimensions are 20" long, 10" wide, and 12" high.
    other sites say 10 gallons for 1...


    so my questions are

    A) how many will be ok in a 10 gallon?

    B) is it better to have sand substrate or river rock substrate? (have read that gravel is bad because they can accidentally ingest it and choke or have their intestines blocked so I am not considering it at all)

    C) live plants? plastic? silk? - - have heard they can really damage live plants and uproot them....

    D) are internal or external "waterfall" filters best?

    E) how do you sex them?

    F) I do not want to breed, will it be bad if I keep 2 of the same sex together? (are males territorial etc?)



    and please feel free to give me any other info/tips you can!

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  3. #2
    Iratus ranunculus
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    A) how many will be ok in a 10 gallon?
    1 is safer. They can be pretty aggressive, particularly around feeding time. If you want one to keep all of his/her gills, I would recommend just one in a 10 gallon.

    B) is it better to have sand substrate or river rock substrate? (have read that gravel is bad because they can accidentally ingest it and choke or have their intestines blocked so I am not considering it at all)
    I would go with sand. If you get the really good stuff used for high end freshwater tanks the particle size is really small and tightly packed. Plants can root in it, and it is tightly packed enough that detritus cannot easily accumulate in it.

    C) live plants? plastic? silk? - - have heard they can really damage live plants and uproot them....

    D) are internal or external "waterfall" filters best?
    Either/or work fairly well. They dont like fast water flow, so a small internal filter may be better so you can block the inflow with a rock or something.

    E) how do you sex them?
    Large swollen cloaca when sexually mature for males.

    F) I do not want to breed, will it be bad if I keep 2 of the same sex together? (are males territorial etc?)
    Again, probably a bad idea to keep two together at all in a tank that size.

  4. #3
    Ken Worthington
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    Hi, there's loads of good advice on this link; http://www.caudata.org/forum/ with a whole sub-forum on axolotls

  5. #4
    Amphibians
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    I got my Axolotl from a lab research supplier. It was very cheap and he is very healthy. This probably isnt always the case but it felt good because he wasnt being sold to a research facility to have his gills cut off or a hectic classroom. Live plants are tricky, as they are being constantly uprooted, I would use the anchors they sell in the fish section. Whatever filter you choose, make sure it creates no current whatsoever. With mine I used the standard 10 gallon fishtank filter than sits on the edge of the tank and spills a small waterfall. Even this was too much, it obviously stressed him and he stayed away from that part of the tank. Just divert the water so it slows down. They are great pets!

  6. #5
    MarshallsMom
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    I have two Axolotls, Marshall (who gives me my screen name) and Maynard.

    A 10 would be okay for a juvenile, but you really wouldn't want to keep one in it long term. They get to be about 10-12 inches long, so picture a ruler in your tank. They also like to swim, and they can't really do that as adults in a ten.

    If you do decide to get a juvenile anyways, know that sand can be devastating to filters. I personally use large river rocks, and I have been fine. You just have to move them around to clean it. Definitely no gravel.

    I have live plants, BUT they do uproot them every time I turn around. Higher end silk plants would be your best bet, because I know mine like to cuddle into them, and some of the plastics can be pointy and sharp.

    Whatever filter you decide on should minimally affect water flow in your tank. Axolotls really don't like moving water.

    Also! They should NEVER be above 70 degrees, and your goal should be 68 degrees Fahrenheit.

    They are really wonderful pets. Feed them earthworms, store bought Trout Worms seem to be the best. Feed them at night. Leave the light off most of the day. Also, they seem to like to interact, so spend a little time in front of the tank everyday. Please PM me with any additional questions. I love talking about Axolotls!

  7. #6

    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    You should ask in a forum called caudata.org which was also made by the founder of this forum John Clare. But in short---From reading that forum this is all I gather:
    1)10 gallons is not enough for even one ADULT(always think of adult size)
    2)Axos are territorial. Like pufferfish. If you want to keep them in a tank Id say a long tank 55g in MY OPINION is the best choice for a couple of axos.
    3)Live plants and fake plants work well. Either way just make sure they have e nough hiding spots.
    4)Use sand because its good for walking about on the bottom and if they swallow it; it passes through easily.

    My tips(IMO):
    -DO not EVER feed bloodworms, mealworms, superworms, beetles, crayfish.
    -1 fully grown axolotl should be kept in a 20long tank. Because they are like turtles in this sense. They need space to roam around. Also look at how big they get. A 10gallon is just simply too small for one.
    -If you want a pair I say a 40breeder would be okay, a 55g is best.
    -Water should only be at most 1foot deep. It is best if its 5-7inches deep of water.
    -Use canister filters
    -Foods that you feed frogs work well for axos, but you can also add frozen fish like freshwater fish(trout). Turtle pellets(reptomin are best) also can be part of their diet.
    -Dont just use one source of food.

    I'd say your best bet is to go over to caudata.org and ask them and look at their caresheets. I may be wrong but I remember reading that they grow up to 12inches. So a tank that is 12inches long isnt the best idea for one. Two is just asking for trouble. Also keep the sides of the tank and the backside of the tank covered(suggestion).

    Good luck and hope this helps.

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    Quote Originally Posted by Deku View Post
    DO not EVER feed bloodworms
    Why is that?
    Founder of Frogforum.net (2008) and Caudata.org (2001)

  9. #8
    MarshallsMom
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    Quote Originally Posted by Deku View Post
    You should ask in a forum called caudata.org which was also made by the founder of this forum John Clare. But in short---From reading that forum this is all I gather:
    1)10 gallons is not enough for even one ADULT(always think of adult size)
    2)Axos are territorial. Like pufferfish. If you want to keep them in a tank Id say a long tank 55g in MY OPINION is the best choice for a couple of axos.
    3)Live plants and fake plants work well. Either way just make sure they have e nough hiding spots.
    4)Use sand because its good for walking about on the bottom and if they swallow it; it passes through easily.

    My tips(IMO):
    -DO not EVER feed bloodworms, mealworms, superworms, beetles, crayfish.
    -1 fully grown axolotl should be kept in a 20long tank. Because they are like turtles in this sense. They need space to roam around. Also look at how big they get. A 10gallon is just simply too small for one.
    -If you want a pair I say a 40breeder would be okay, a 55g is best.
    -Water should only be at most 1foot deep. It is best if its 5-7inches deep of water.
    -Use canister filters
    -Foods that you feed frogs work well for axos, but you can also add frozen fish like freshwater fish(trout). Turtle pellets(reptomin are best) also can be part of their diet.
    -Dont just use one source of food.

    I'd say your best bet is to go over to caudata.org and ask them and look at their caresheets. I may be wrong but I remember reading that they grow up to 12inches. So a tank that is 12inches long isnt the best idea for one. Two is just asking for trouble. Also keep the sides of the tank and the backside of the tank covered(suggestion).

    Good luck and hope this helps.
    In my experience, unlike puffers, it hasn't been the territoriality of the Axolotls, so much as they just need room to do their thing. My Golden Albino, Marshall, loves to swim laps, which he couldn't do in a ten. Marshall lives with another Axolotl named Maynard, and, please, someone correct me if this is an anomaly, but they genuinely seem to enjoy each other's company. I keep mine in a 36 x 12 inch tank so they have the full run of a three foot long tank, but they hang out with each other most of the time. When they were little babies (3 inches) they shared the same chunk of food. It really is fun to observe an obvious bond between the two creatures.

    I am interested in why you say not to feed bloodworms. I feed mine bloodworms, and have never had a problem, other than the fact they are messy, which I remedied by using a small ceramic reptile bowl in the bottom of their tank for the worms.

    The general rule for Axolotls is a square foot per creature, and, in my opinion, a little extra wiggle room. I have my two juveniles (6 inches each) in a tank with 36 x 12 inches of floor space, and I feel that they can grow up just fine in that. I wouldn't add another Axolotl to that tank, although, technically speaking, I have the floor space.

    As for feeding your Axolotl, in my experience, and the collective knowledge of the people I've spoken with, earthworms are a solid choice for the brunt of their diet. I feed mine Trout Worms, which are smaller than nightcrawlers, and they have been perfect. My Axolotls have been growing wonderfully since I switched them onto earthworms at the advice of my dear friend Shannon, who currently has 11 thriving Axolotls. I would be extremely hesitant to feed my boys Reptomin. It is a great source of nutrition for turtles, the animal it was developed for. However, since Axolotls and any kind of turtle are vastly different animals, it stands to reason that they have vastly different dietary requirements. The same goes for saying that frog food is appropriate for Axolotls. I've heard wonderful things about sinking salmon pellets, although I have yet to try them. I have only found them available in fifty pound bags, which would be a little ridiculous for my two Axolotls.

    My water is about 13 inches deep, and I have never had any sort of problem. My oxygen levels are very good. However, I do use a waterfall style filter which circulates the water. But, the bright side of having deeper tank water is that the water at the bottom is perfectly still. I also positioned their driftwood directly underneath the fall to help combat some of the disruption to the water.

    Again, though, in my humble opinion, a 10 is simply too small for an axolotl long term. Along those same lines, perhaps a small variety of newt would be fun? I kept fire bellies, which were adorable and engaging to watch.

    I sincerely hope this helps, and, again, feel free to PM me with any concerns, questions, or comments.

    Hannah

  10. #9

    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    Why is that?
    Blood worms are known to be bad for frogs. Because they sometimes contain parasites and such.

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    Quote Originally Posted by Deku View Post
    Blood worms are known to be bad for frogs. Because they sometimes contain parasites and such.
    Not the frozen kind. I have used them for over a decade.
    Founder of Frogforum.net (2008) and Caudata.org (2001)

  12. #11

    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    Quote Originally Posted by MarshallsMom View Post
    In my experience, unlike puffers, it hasn't been the territoriality of the Axolotls, so much as they just need room to do their thing. My Golden Albino, Marshall, loves to swim laps, which he couldn't do in a ten. Marshall lives with another Axolotl named Maynard, and, please, someone correct me if this is an anomaly, but they genuinely seem to enjoy each other's company. I keep mine in a 36 x 12 inch tank so they have the full run of a three foot long tank, but they hang out with each other most of the time. When they were little babies (3 inches) they shared the same chunk of food. It really is fun to observe an obvious bond between the two creatures.

    I am interested in why you say not to feed bloodworms. I feed mine bloodworms, and have never had a problem, other than the fact they are messy, which I remedied by using a small ceramic reptile bowl in the bottom of their tank for the worms.

    The general rule for Axolotls is a square foot per creature, and, in my opinion, a little extra wiggle room. I have my two juveniles (6 inches each) in a tank with 36 x 12 inches of floor space, and I feel that they can grow up just fine in that. I wouldn't add another Axolotl to that tank, although, technically speaking, I have the floor space.

    As for feeding your Axolotl, in my experience, and the collective knowledge of the people I've spoken with, earthworms are a solid choice for the brunt of their diet. I feed mine Trout Worms, which are smaller than nightcrawlers, and they have been perfect. My Axolotls have been growing wonderfully since I switched them onto earthworms at the advice of my dear friend Shannon, who currently has 11 thriving Axolotls. I would be extremely hesitant to feed my boys Reptomin. It is a great source of nutrition for turtles, the animal it was developed for. However, since Axolotls and any kind of turtle are vastly different animals, it stands to reason that they have vastly different dietary requirements. The same goes for saying that frog food is appropriate for Axolotls. I've heard wonderful things about sinking salmon pellets, although I have yet to try them. I have only found them available in fifty pound bags, which would be a little ridiculous for my two Axolotls.

    My water is about 13 inches deep, and I have never had any sort of problem. My oxygen levels are very good. However, I do use a waterfall style filter which circulates the water. But, the bright side of having deeper tank water is that the water at the bottom is perfectly still. I also positioned their driftwood directly underneath the fall to help combat some of the disruption to the water.

    Again, though, in my humble opinion, a 10 is simply too small for an axolotl long term. Along those same lines, perhaps a small variety of newt would be fun? I kept fire bellies, which were adorable and engaging to watch.

    I sincerely hope this helps, and, again, feel free to PM me with any concerns, questions, or comments.

    Hannah
    Bloodworms are known to harbor parasites. Agreed 10gallons is too small for one. Id say your tank is a 40breeder? Personally Id prefer to give the amphibian more room to swim but thats just what I think. I dont know its more like if you take a few steps back from the tank and you see the swim space the animal is offered is not too big. I was reading somewhere about they being aggressive towards each other. Again I cant verify that because I dont own any(its illegal here). But what I do know is its better to be safe than sorry. So I would provide visual boundries for them. They are good swimmers, but itd be a pain for them to constantly gasp for air? Although Iam comparing this to african clawed frogs(the water level). Reptomin is a good source of calcium, but agreed it shouldnt be the staple diet of the axo. Earthworms are always great to feed to any reptile and amphibian. Never had any problems with them.

  13. #12

    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    Quote Originally Posted by MarshallsMom View Post
    In my experience, unlike puffers, it hasn't been the territoriality of the Axolotls, so much as they just need room to do their thing. My Golden Albino, Marshall, loves to swim laps, which he couldn't do in a ten. Marshall lives with another Axolotl named Maynard, and, please, someone correct me if this is an anomaly, but they genuinely seem to enjoy each other's company. I keep mine in a 36 x 12 inch tank so they have the full run of a three foot long tank, but they hang out with each other most of the time. When they were little babies (3 inches) they shared the same chunk of food. It really is fun to observe an obvious bond between the two creatures.

    I am interested in why you say not to feed bloodworms. I feed mine bloodworms, and have never had a problem, other than the fact they are messy, which I remedied by using a small ceramic reptile bowl in the bottom of their tank for the worms.

    The general rule for Axolotls is a square foot per creature, and, in my opinion, a little extra wiggle room. I have my two juveniles (6 inches each) in a tank with 36 x 12 inches of floor space, and I feel that they can grow up just fine in that. I wouldn't add another Axolotl to that tank, although, technically speaking, I have the floor space.

    As for feeding your Axolotl, in my experience, and the collective knowledge of the people I've spoken with, earthworms are a solid choice for the brunt of their diet. I feed mine Trout Worms, which are smaller than nightcrawlers, and they have been perfect. My Axolotls have been growing wonderfully since I switched them onto earthworms at the advice of my dear friend Shannon, who currently has 11 thriving Axolotls. I would be extremely hesitant to feed my boys Reptomin. It is a great source of nutrition for turtles, the animal it was developed for. However, since Axolotls and any kind of turtle are vastly different animals, it stands to reason that they have vastly different dietary requirements. The same goes for saying that frog food is appropriate for Axolotls. I've heard wonderful things about sinking salmon pellets, although I have yet to try them. I have only found them available in fifty pound bags, which would be a little ridiculous for my two Axolotls.

    My water is about 13 inches deep, and I have never had any sort of problem. My oxygen levels are very good. However, I do use a waterfall style filter which circulates the water. But, the bright side of having deeper tank water is that the water at the bottom is perfectly still. I also positioned their driftwood directly underneath the fall to help combat some of the disruption to the water.

    Again, though, in my humble opinion, a 10 is simply too small for an axolotl long term. Along those same lines, perhaps a small variety of newt would be fun? I kept fire bellies, which were adorable and engaging to watch.

    I sincerely hope this helps, and, again, feel free to PM me with any concerns, questions, or comments.

    Hannah
    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    Not the frozen kind. I have used them for over a decade.
    They come frozen? I didnt know that. Well I guess thats not as bad. I was assuming you guys ment live bloodworms(I know stores that sells them, and blackworms).

  14. #13
    MarshallsMom
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    Quote Originally Posted by Deku View Post
    Bloodworms are known to harbor parasites. Agreed 10gallons is too small for one. Id say your tank is a 40breeder? Personally Id prefer to give the amphibian more room to swim but thats just what I think. I dont know its more like if you take a few steps back from the tank and you see the swim space the animal is offered is not too big. I was reading somewhere about they being aggressive towards each other. Again I cant verify that because I dont own any(its illegal here). But what I do know is its better to be safe than sorry. So I would provide visual boundries for them. They are good swimmers, but itd be a pain for them to constantly gasp for air? Although Iam comparing this to african clawed frogs(the water level). Reptomin is a good source of calcium, but agreed it shouldnt be the staple diet of the axo. Earthworms are always great to feed to any reptile and amphibian. Never had any problems with them.
    Axolotls have gills, so they don't have to gasp for air. The 6 frills on their heads are their gills.

    Again, just because something is ideal for one animal doesn't always mean it translates to another animal, especially two as varied as ACFs and Axolotls. Look at the difference in care requirements between different frogs, or even different breeds of dog. In my opinion, it is important to approach each animal as an individual, and not to make assumptions about the care.

    As for the Reptomin, I wouldn't feed it to my Axolotls at all. It has a lot of ingredients that, while good for turtles, are unnecessary for Axolotls. Also, Axoltols' skeletons are mostly comprised of cartilage, so not much calcium is required. A turtles shell is actually made up of many fused bones, so a turtle requires a lot of calcium to keep its shell healthy. This is just one example of how these animals differ.

    Let's talk about bloodworms!
    Piiglet, if you are still considering an Axolotl, know that frozen bloodworms are readily available in almost any pet store, and in all of the packages I've gone through (which is a LOT, believe you me) I have never had a problem with parasites. If you did decide to go with a live worm feeding route, you could culture your own, minimizing the chance of parasites.
    I also think that is unfair to single out bloodworms as a predominant source of parasites. Earthworms, feeder fish, blackworms... All routinely fed to pets, all have parasite potential.

    If anyone reading this has any questions about Axolotls, please don't hesitate to PM me. I don't consider myself an expert (yet ) but I will certainly do my best to help.
    Hannah

  15. #14
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    I have kept axoltls for many years, just got 18 at the moment. Overcrowding causes them to bite at each other,dim lighting seems to reduce this. Live bloodworm is my food of choice for young animals that still require food that is moving but have got past the brine shrimp stage. I have had good results feeding top end (expensive) fish foods designed for predatory fish. Some of these are well balanced with vits and minerals and, in the UK at least, give detailed breakdowns of the nutritional values. I also use as wide a variety of other foods as I can, cut up raw freshwater king prawns give good growth rates but work out expensive!
    This year I had more young axolotls than I could easily keep in doors so I put a few into a large plastic tub in my garden that I use for growing pondweed and daphnia, there are lots of things swimming around in there and they have done very well, they are not quite as big as those I kept inside, but I selected the bigger ones anyway, but they are much more interestingly and heavily marked, including some that seemed to be pure white when I first put them in.

  16. #15
    ZombieAxolotl
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    To start off, no offense, but some people that don't or have never owned Axie's might not want to go on whole diatribe's about them giving wrong information to new or potential owners.

    Caudata.org Newt and Salamander Forum is a great resource

    Axolotls: The Fascinating Mexican Axolotl and the Tiger Salamander also a great resource.


    Quote Originally Posted by piiglet View Post
    so my questions are

    A) how many will be ok in a 10 gallon?
    One! Many people keep more then one in a 10gallon, but it really is just too small for two.

    Quote Originally Posted by piiglet View Post
    B) is it better to have sand substrate or river rock substrate? (have read that gravel is bad because they can accidentally ingest it and choke or have their intestines blocked so I am not considering it at all)
    Sand is easier for cleaning. I do not use it personally. They will ingest it, and pass it. but I find it just disturbing lol. I keep all my axolotls on bare tank floor with a few river rocks for them to climb around on. Some of them have caves because they are shyer.

    Quote Originally Posted by piiglet View Post
    C) live plants? plastic? silk? - - have heard they can really damage live plants and uproot them....
    I love a live plant in with any water baby. It's really good for water quality. These guys do like to root around. So I usually just go with a nice clump of Java moss.. it will grow fine not attached to anything and it supplies a hiding place too. I've used marimo moss balls as welll.

    Quote Originally Posted by piiglet View Post
    D) are internal or external "waterfall" filters best?
    One the few axolotl tanks I have filters on I use a sponge filter. they make almost no current, which is ideal. Axie's will usually get very stressed with waterfall filters or internal filters that have powerheads. I choose to do weekly, partial water changes on my non-filtered tanks. It's really a personal preference and how much water changing you want to do.

    Quote Originally Posted by piiglet View Post
    E) how do you sex them?
    axolotl.org has some pictures up but when they are sexually mature size the base of the tail (cloaca) will be swollen on a male.

    Quote Originally Posted by piiglet View Post
    F) I do not want to breed, will it be bad if I keep 2 of the same sex together? (are males territorial etc?)
    You can keep two together with enough room, (not in a 10 gallon). If you do end up with a larger tank and two of them. and they end up breeding, They do lay eggs that can be removed. or really you can leave them and they will eat them. Lots of people remove the eggs and hatch them, or if they don't have the time they sell them. I've seen them go for about $0.50 to a $1 per egg on here. Usually people just sell them for shipping costs. Or donate them to the local school as a science project for the kids.

    Quote Originally Posted by piiglet View Post
    and please feel free to give me any other info/tips you can!
    You can feed Bloodworms (frozen or live) my local petstore feeds their live with no parasite problems.
    Earth worms are a big love of them (cut up for smaller babies)
    Blackworms, Tubifex, whitworms, worms lol
    Most people feed their axies a pelleted salmon food it's extruded in several sizes. (I personally don't because most of an extremely high fat content)

    Personally my colony eats a variety of food.
    Live feeder fish are usually always in my tanks, It keeps them busy and interested and is also something to give them exercise.
    Earthworms, Frozen Bloodworms,
    Hikari sinking carnivore pellets (I just started experimenting with these and it's going extremely well)
    If you use these I will say if you over feed it will tint the water red so don't freak out

    They do not really like floating food. and I think this also causes bloat with them. They suck up their food so when it's floating a lot of air goes in too. So no turtle foods.

    They do not like a lot of change if you keep their habitat the same all the time. I've heard horror stories of people giving away an axie and it dying because of new water or new enviornment. I actually combat this by rearranging the tanks when I do my water changes. Since I started doing this i've never had any stress issues with moves or tank changes.

    Any questions, just ask.
    4 Melanoid, 2 Albino, 2 Golden Albino, 4 Wild, 2 GFP, and 6 A. Andersoni

  17. #16
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    I hate to drag up an old thread, but I would love owning one albino, but is that mean to deny them interactions with another of their own species? Do they gain from a social interaction? Or are they just as happy kept singly? That is my main question on them now, since your post was so informative, and I have already browsed the caudata forum many times.

  18. #17
    AnimalEnthusiast
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    Default Re: Interested in axolotls

    How long does it take, after you've clicked on the link, for the moderators to approve your new account?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Worthington View Post
    Hi, there's loads of good advice on this link; Caudata.org Newt and Salamander Forum with a whole sub-forum on axolotls

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