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Thread: Hello

  1. #1

    Default Hello

    I kept bumping into these forums earlier while trying to do some research. I enjoyed reading enough to register.

    I have two Blue Dumpies and a brand new Malaysian Leaf Frog, which I just purchased yesterday. I bought my first dumpy about 14 months ago, and I've had the other since the beginning of this year. I've had my dumpies in the 12x12 Exo-Terra habitat, but I'm upgrading now to the 18X18, and I have the materials to make it into a vivarium, including some live plants. This is my very first vivarium, so any tips would be great.

    Also, I wouldn't mind any information on the Malaysian Leaf Frog. Everything I have found online (and I spent quite a long time looking) seems to be conflicting.

  2. #2
    Kurt
    Guest

    Default Re: Hello

    Welcome aboard. Since I have never kept them, I am assuming you can keep them like a toad. Sorry I can't help with the Megophrys, but you can check out http://amphibiaweb.org/cgi/amphib_qu...pecies=montana for at least some info.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Hello

    That was one site I checked out earlier, but I looked up megophyrs nasuta.

    The seller said that they were hardy, low-maintenance, don't jump much, and cannot be bred in captivity. I found some sites that said this frog are great jumpers and to make sure I have a tall tank. Some sites say they are easy to take care of, others say it's hard to keep them alive more than a few months. One site said breeding was very easy, and another said the first successful breeding in captivity happened this past year. Not that I am actually interested in breeding; but it's interesting how different all the little information I found was.

  4. #4
    Founder John's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hello

    I've never kept these personally but I have close friends who have. They are not a small frog, and while they aren't huge jumpers "proportionally", their size means that their hop is quite respectable in distance. So as with any frog like that, larger enclosures are better, particularly for recent captives. Recent captives can be delicate due to the stress of collection, travel and sitting in a wholesaler's warehouse for a while. Kurt's right - you can keep them like toads. They like a bit more moisture than we would recommend for Bufonids though, and they like a nice carpet of dead leaves in order to feel secure. The Megophrys species that are available in captivity have all have very similar requirements so this is a good guideline. They should be maintained at temperatures in the mid-to-late 20s Celsius (75-85 F).

    As for the breeding record, I don't believe last year was the first time. I think they've been bred several times in the past in Europe.

    Welcome to the forum .
    Founder of Frogforum.net (2008) and Caudata.org (2001)

  5. #5

    Default Re: Hello

    Thank you for the info. I did buy dead leaves when I got the guy. Right now, he's going into the 12x12 Exo-Terra. He'll probably get upgraded sometime, but I had already determined that the dumpies were going into a bigger habitat after I bought the supplies for a vivarium ata reptile expo, and I wasn't going to back down from that. I joked with friends that those two little frogs have cost me more than a month's rent in two days...and will probably have more room to move around than I will in my apartment.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Hello

    Also...without having a sort of pump like I'll have in my larger tank, do you know of a way I can water in the smaller one for the Malaysian Leaf Frog without just having a water dish in there? Probably not? Maybe I'll just need to get another pump and set it up better.

  7. #7
    Founder John's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hello

    You could close off some of the screen lid to keep the humidity up.
    Founder of Frogforum.net (2008) and Caudata.org (2001)

  8. #8
    StephenLS
    Guest

    Default Re: Hello

    Hi there

    I've had a group of 3 Malaysian Leaf Frogs (M. Montana) for about 2 months now.

    Montana are apparently a little smaller than Nasuta and consequently the females are less prone to eating the males!

    Apparently it's hard for people to tell the difference between the Nasuta and Montana but care is roughly the same.

    I keep mine in a 45 x 45 x 60 Exo Terra Viv. Temperatures peak at 26c and hit a minimum of 22c during the night. I spray twice a day to keep humidity between 85 - 100 %

    They are very shy, so I have provided them with a heavily planted tank with a couple of hides aswell.

    I hear the males calling more or less every night and am currently working on setting up a viv with the intention of breeding

    Hope this helps.

    Steve

  9. #9

    Default Re: Hello

    This helps very much. Thank you.

    Last night, as soon as I turned off the light, I could hear the frog jumping around, so I'm excited; the entire day before it did not move from it's spot.

    What do you feed yours? Just crickets?

  10. #10
    StephenLS
    Guest

    Default Re: Hello

    I've tried crickets, wax worms, moths and small locusts.

    They seem in good health so they must be eating but I've only seen it a couple of times - I really need to spend a couple of nights just watching them!

  11. #11

    Default Re: Hello

    Do wax worms immediately try to burrow like mealworms do?

    I'm excited. I was so determined, though, not to buy an animal at this reptile expo. And then I fell in love with the frog.

    Actually, I was hoping for clown tree frogs, but there were none. And then I fell in love with the leaf frog.

  12. #12
    StephenLS
    Guest

    Default Re: Hello

    Also I dust mine with a calcium/vitamin dust once a week....and I've purchased a frog worming solution to use on them - don't know about in the US but they are damn expensive over here and I want to keep them in tip top shape!

  13. #13

    Default Re: Hello

    Deworming for frogs is something I have never heard of. Anyone care to explain some more?

  14. #14
    StephenLS
    Guest

    Default Re: Hello

    They do burrow but not straight away. You can put them in a shallow bowl - but it isn't a major problem if they burrow as they pupate and become tasty moths!

    I am similarly weak willed and always end up coming home with something new from shows!

    ps - Clown Tree Frogs are awesome - I've wanted some for ages as-well!

  15. #15
    StephenLS
    Guest

    Default Re: Hello

    I think the stuff I've got is called Levacol - you just put a drop on the back of the frog's neck! I'm not sure what anyone else is using?

  16. #16

    Default Re: Hello

    Do the frogs bury themselves all the time? How deep is your substrate and what do you use? Soil, moss, leaves?

  17. #17
    StephenLS
    Guest

    Default Re: Hello

    My substrate is the coco fibre stuff you can get in compressed packs - it's about 3 inches in depth but this is mainly for the benefit of the plants as the frogs don't seem to burrow - they do however like to hide in their cave.

    A layer of leaves on top should suffice!

  18. #18
    Kurt
    Guest

    Default Re: Hello

    Quote Originally Posted by 1beataway View Post
    Deworming for frogs is something I have never heard of. Anyone care to explain some more?
    Most wild caught amphibians will have some form of gastrointestinal parasite load. Being new to captivity, a new animal is under stress and so its immunity system weakens, leaving vulnerable to a bloom of GI parasites. So that is why "de-worm" new animals, its to give them a fighting chance.

    I use metronidazole to kill protozoa and fenbendazole to kill worms. Both drugs are administer orally and treatments should be spread apart by at least three days. In other words don't give both drugs at the same time.

    A veterinarian should be the one to administer the drugs, as most people do not have access to these drugs or the knowledge to do this. A fecal float should also be performed by your vet using a sample that is no longer than 24 hours old. Also the sample shouldn't be taken from a water bowl or similar, as it will not test properly.


    How does Levacol work if you are placing on the back of the neck? How does it get to the gastrointestinal track to kill the parasites there. Something just doesn't make sense to me. Maybe someone can explain it to me, as I have never heard of this drug.

    Also I have clown treefrogs, nah-nah-nah-nah.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Hello

    I'll have to find a vet then!

    I want clown tree frogs.

    I set up my vivarium for my dumpies. I'll post pics when I figure out how.

  20. #20
    Kurt
    Guest

    Default Re: Hello

    When you post go advance and click on the paper clip.

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