Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Multiple species in one outdoor bin?

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Nationality
    [United States]
    Posts
    4

    Default Multiple species in one outdoor bin?

    I've really been wanting an American Toad for quite a while now and done lots of research. I unfortunately have a significant other who has a very strict rule about no pets that eat bugs...but I can be convincing! I was thinking about a worm bin on the back deck that also contained isopods as I think the two species would do well together. Would crickets possibly work in there also? Then there's no stink and noise inside.

    I know this would only work in the warmer months but during that time it would keep feed cost down considerably. I also have more questions on this setup...

    Do they sell feeder earthworms to cut down on parasites? I know having them outside could already expose them but would be much lower than if taken directly from the woods out back of me.

    Also could they possibly winter/hibernate/whatever or would I need to refresh each species every year? Could I do this all in a big storage bin with a few holes for air?

    Sorry for so many questions!

  2. # ADS
    Circuit advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Posts
    Many
     

  3. #2
    100+ Post Member Cliygh and Mia 2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Nationality
    [United States]
    Location
    Georgia, USA
    Posts
    1,467
    Picture Albums: Member Photo Albums

    Default Re: Multiple species in one outdoor bin?

    To answer your questions to the best of my ability:

    The type of enclosure you are planning on setting up is a bioactive enclosure. Basically, the isopods, springtails, and earthworms decompose the waste matter the animals produce, meaning you do not have to spend as much time cleaning the enclosure as you would with a regular enclosure.

    I'd imagine crickets would work, you would just have to watch them as they are known to occasionally damage amphibians by biting/eating them. If you're looking for another thing to add to the enclosure, I would imagine mealworms and their adult beetle form would work nice in the enclosure, and serve as food for the toads if they are found by them.

    Earthworms should be easy to find in bait & tackle shops and online specialty stores, I believe Josh's frogs has the best type of earthworm for that type of enclosure, Canadian nightcrawlers. It would be easier to have the enclosure inside, as you could provide heat, water, humidity, and other things the animals would need much easier. If your spouse doesn't like it indoors, you can either move it somewhere where they never go, such as an attic or basement with electricity, or if they still won't like it, it would be better to not attempt to acquire American toads at all, and look for some other animal to use in place of it.

    If the storage bin has a drainage layer, and has enough space, it should work, as glass enclosures are not the only type of enclosure on the market. If I remember correctly mealworms die off in the winter, but those are easy to re-stock. Isopods, springtails, and earthworms are all active in all but the coldest weather. The American toads if kept outside during the winter months, will need to either be moved indoors, or allowed to hibernate. If they do hibernate, they should be ready to breed by the time most storms roll around in the area, so it will get noisy hearing males call, if there are any. I would suggest keeping the enclosure indoors though, as it's less stressful on the animals since they do not have to hibernate, and you can monitor them for diseases and keep them out of the elements.

    Hope that helped!
    Last edited by Cliygh and Mia 2; 6 Days Ago at 04:05 PM. Reason: Fixed typos
    My adoptive family: Nothing anymore sadly

  4. #3
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Nationality
    [United States]
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Multiple species in one outdoor bin?

    I apologize for not being very clear about this. The toads would be inside the home in still a bioactive set up though with plants and such, I have a 20 long already. The feeder bin would be completely separate, to grow and breed feeders only. The issues is with the creepy crawlers being housed and bred in the home. The deck is easily accessible, private and has a water spout plus I go out several times a day already so upkeep would be no issue.

    And yes that was very helpful thank you so much!

  5. #4
    100+ Post Member Cliygh and Mia 2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Nationality
    [United States]
    Location
    Georgia, USA
    Posts
    1,467
    Picture Albums: Member Photo Albums

    Default Re: Multiple species in one outdoor bin?

    If you plan on breeding feeder insects outdoors, I think it should work, as many people breed cultures for their pets. Crickets should work as a decomposer as well, since there's no risk of them damaging the toads. I would also recommend being sure nothing can get in, and nothing can get out, as I would imagine Raccoons would love an easy buffet of earthworms and other invertebrates, and I would imagine accidentally establishing an invasive population of something would cause a harmful change to the ecosystem.

    Hope this helps!
    Last edited by Cliygh and Mia 2; 6 Days Ago at 08:02 PM. Reason: Phone autocorrected toads to roads
    My adoptive family: Nothing anymore sadly

  6. #5
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Nationality
    [United States]
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Multiple species in one outdoor bin?

    I plan on having a latch tote of considerable size so it'll be heavy. There are raccoons that come by, if need be I'll get crafty. I was only going to do native stuff in the chance of an escapee. Worms, isopods and crickets all live right out back already. Thank you again for the information and help!

  7. This member thanks MayQueen for this post:


  8. #6
    100+ Post Member daybr4ke's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Nationality
    [United States]
    Location
    California
    Posts
    440
    Picture Albums: Member Photo Albums

    Default Re: Multiple species in one outdoor bin?

    Hi! While I love the idea of using native insects, there are some issues I feel I should mention. Wild insects often carry some degree of parasites, which they can pass to your frog when eaten. There may be a way to treat insects for parasites to prepare them for colony creation, but I don't know how. I suppose you could also simply seperate the eggs from the adults and never use the wild caught crickets as feeders. That way they (should?) never pass the parasites onto their young. However, outside it is
    harder to limit their contact with other insects that may pass them onto the colony anyway. Also, Raccoons can work simple latches, so you may have to "get crafty" lol. Honestly, I would recommend keeping them inside or in a shed or garage if it's not attached to the house, or a greenhouse. Something to keep it out of reach of the raccoons. I hope this helps. Good luck!
    1 Male Giant African Bullfrog
    2 Woodhouse's Toads
    11 Pacific Treefrogs
    1 Dubia Roach Colony
    2 Australian Green Treefrogs

  9. This member thanks daybr4ke for this post:


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. multiple tree frog species in same tank?
    By brian c in forum Tree Frogs
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: December 16th, 2014, 10:58 AM
  2. Replies: 8
    Last Post: September 19th, 2014, 09:40 PM
  3. Multiple Species in Same Setup
    By DuctTape in forum Other Frogs & Toads
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 11th, 2013, 08:17 PM
  4. For Sale: Multiple gecko species
    By Speleomander in forum For Sale/Trade
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: June 15th, 2013, 11:17 PM
  5. Keeping multiple species of Tree frog.
    By ViciousAlice in forum Tree Frogs
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 20th, 2010, 10:38 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •