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    Default African Clawed Frogs

    Hey guys I haven't been on here for a while. I been going through soo many life style changes. I now only keep one aquarium(apartment rules). I can keep up to a 75gallon tank.

    I was wondering how many of these frogs could I keep in there? I already had one from my previous collection(I had more but after I found out my old lid wasn't as tight as I thought it was--- found the rest all dried when I came back from work).

    Also anyway to make the lid completely escape proof while allowing some air exchange? I used to use those metal lids... But they sorta rusted easily(no duh lol) and I had to change to glass. But that's where a few escaped.

    Any tips suggestions?

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    100+ Post Member mpmistr's Avatar
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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Deku View Post
    Hey guys I haven't been on here for a while. I been going through soo many life style changes. I now only keep one aquarium(apartment rules). I can keep up to a 75gallon tank.

    I was wondering how many of these frogs could I keep in there? I already had one from my previous collection(I had more but after I found out my old lid wasn't as tight as I thought it was--- found the rest all dried when I came back from work).

    Also anyway to make the lid completely escape proof while allowing some air exchange? I used to use those metal lids... But they sorta rusted easily(no duh lol) and I had to change to glass. But that's where a few escaped.

    Any tips suggestions?
    Depends on your filtration but a 75g should comfortably hold 6-8 frogs.

    I use a glass lid personally but I also use a canister filter so cutting holes in the plastic back edge to fit the tubing makes it pretty tight fit and does not allow escapes. You may want to cover the gaps with tape or something like that.

    I don't think my tank lid is 'air tight' but when I'm home (and paying attention) I do open the lid up and let it get air so the tank can 'breathe', I think it helps my floating plants. I lower my water level about 3 or 4 inches to also prevent escapes further. I think in a 75 gallon you should easily be able to do that without sacrificing much water volume.

    I too have had escapes, I was fortunate enough to find him hiding under my lazyboy.. lol (having hard wood floors helped too I think).

    I really recommend a canister filter because intake/outtake tubes don't leave many gaps in your lid, HOB filters tend to leave avenues of escape all over the place..

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmistr View Post
    Depends on your filtration but a 75g should comfortably hold 6-8 frogs.

    I use a glass lid personally but I also use a canister filter so cutting holes in the plastic back edge to fit the tubing makes it pretty tight fit and does not allow escapes. You may want to cover the gaps with tape or something like that.

    I don't think my tank lid is 'air tight' but when I'm home (and paying attention) I do open the lid up and let it get air so the tank can 'breathe', I think it helps my floating plants. I lower my water level about 3 or 4 inches to also prevent escapes further. I think in a 75 gallon you should easily be able to do that without sacrificing much water volume.

    I too have had escapes, I was fortunate enough to find him hiding under my lazyboy.. lol (having hard wood floors helped too I think).

    I really recommend a canister filter because intake/outtake tubes don't leave many gaps in your lid, HOB filters tend to leave avenues of escape all over the place..
    I tried canisters when I had turtles. Things were a pain to clean out. I'm actually going for a sump. Where everything will be cleaner and easier to clean too also increasing water volume. So I could easily keep 6-8 in there?

    That sure opens up a lot of ideas. Like I could get:
    - Piebalds
    -Rectic
    -Wild type(online store is the one that has these)
    -Reg. lab bred ones.


    There's this online store that sells specific feed for them. I'm hoping that will be their staple(currently on reptomin) with red wrigglers once or twice a week.

    I currently feed mine every other day sometimes every two days. I saw on a site saying "feed daily" but I noticed mine got really obese doing this (when I first had one).

    I also know for a fact they like aquatic plants. But can they be fake? A site said they had to be "real". I don't want a huge mess with that. Had em once all it does is get the tank messy in a day or two. Especially since these fellas like to dig and kick things.



    Would it be wise to make small holes in the plastic lid and then use aquarium sealant to put on the lid a sort of plastic mesh(to prevent anything from slipping in or out).

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Deku View Post
    I tried canisters when I had turtles. Things were a pain to clean out. I'm actually going for a sump. Where everything will be cleaner and easier to clean too also increasing water volume. So I could easily keep 6-8 in there?
    I think 6-8 frogs is a good number to keep in that size of aquarium safely. Technically the tank could support a few more but the more frogs you keep together the greater your risk of infections such as red leg increase.

    I don't have much experience with fresh water sumps or as they're also called 'refugiums'. I have read about them and they do seem neat, they do increase your water volume but I do not think they really make up for good bio/mech filtration that a canister filter gives you. My Eheim Classic filter is probably one single best product I've ever purchased for my aquarium so I guess we will have to agree to disagree on filtration.

    That sure opens up a lot of ideas. Like I could get:
    - Piebalds
    -Rectic
    -Wild type(online store is the one that has these)
    -Reg. lab bred ones.
    The care for these variations of xenopus are all the same, but yes you could mix it up if you were able to locate a supplier of the more rare types.


    There's this online store that sells specific feed for them.
    Xenopus.com? Yes they do sell pellets for these animals, I've never really read a review of this food. I would assume it is of high quality, the site mainly seems to sell xenopus as lab animals, kind of pricey but may very well be worth it if you desire rare pigmented frogs.

    I'm hoping that will be their staple(currently on reptomin) with red wrigglers once or twice a week.
    Reptomin is really not considered a high quality pellet food -however- it seems to be a great staple for african clawed frogs. Some may disagree, but I've never heard of an ACF owner who had an issue with reptomin as a staple. It does have high protein but the phosphorus / calcium ratio is a bit poor.. I think supplementing earthworms would make up for this deficiency. May want to skip the red wrigglers and go straight for canadian nightcrawlers. For one red wrigglers are a bit less palatable (though I doubt a xenopus would care.. most frogs do) and there seems to be some talk that red wrigglers may be a bit toxic (at least to garter snakes). I'd play it safe, eventually your frogs become so large they will prefer the larger canadian nightcrawlers anyways, and if you buy from a bait store or walmart, they cost the same anyways.

    I currently feed mine every other day sometimes every two days. I saw on a site saying "feed daily" but I noticed mine got really obese doing this (when I first had one).
    Sub-adults should be fed daily, adults should be fed 3-4 times a week. You're absolutely right, if fed daily they become quite fat. Then again it also depends on how much you feed them, if you fed them a little bit each day, that would be fine. My feeding regimen is one canadian nightcrawler each, every other day, some days I skip the earthworms and feed reptomin, so roughly 3 earthworms and 1 reptomin feeding, per week. Crickets are also given as treats, usually on reptomin days (worms make fat, stuffed frogs).

    I also know for a fact they like aquatic plants.
    Yes

    But can they be fake?
    Yes, but be wary of plastic plants. They can easily cut the delicate webbing of their feet. Go silk or real plants.

    A site said they had to be "real".
    I would argue this site is correct. Real plants help add additional biofiltration, improve water quality, and create a more natural habitat.

    I don't want a huge mess with that. Had em once all it does is get the tank messy in a day or two. Especially since these fellas like to dig and kick things.
    Not really. Their plant destroying prowess is a bit overrated. True nightmares to planted tanks would be turtles, goldfish, cichlids, ect...

    My ACF tank has jungle vals, bacopa, moss, water sprite, wisteria, duckweed, and frog bit and it all grows just fine they hardly if ever kick up anything.

    My best advice here and what is more beneficial for your frogs, get water sprite (indian fern, there are several varieties of this plant). Skip the fake stuff, floating plants such as this are fantastic, grow quickly, keep your nitrates under control and have some superb advantages..

    For starters floating plants have one HUGE overlooked benefit, it makes frogs less prone to escaping. They provide a general feeling of security to the frog (froggy thought: predators can't see me! I have these plants hiding me!). They give the frog the ability to bask, watch them at night, they will use water sprite to rest -- with their nose above the water. Think how nice it is for them, an aquatic air breathing animal to have the ability to rest, breathe, relax..

    Would it be wise to make small holes in the plastic lid and then use aquarium sealant to put on the lid a sort of plastic mesh(to prevent anything from slipping in or out).
    I don't see why not.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmistr View Post
    I think 6-8 frogs is a good number to keep in that size of aquarium safely. Technically the tank could support a few more but the more frogs you keep together the greater your risk of infections such as red leg increase.

    I don't have much experience with fresh water sumps or as they're also called 'refugiums'. I have read about them and they do seem neat, they do increase your water volume but I do not think they really make up for good bio/mech filtration that a canister filter gives you. My Eheim Classic filter is probably one single best product I've ever purchased for my aquarium so I guess we will have to agree to disagree on filtration.



    The care for these variations of xenopus are all the same, but yes you could mix it up if you were able to locate a supplier of the more rare types.




    Xenopus.com? Yes they do sell pellets for these animals, I've never really read a review of this food. I would assume it is of high quality, the site mainly seems to sell xenopus as lab animals, kind of pricey but may very well be worth it if you desire rare pigmented frogs.



    Reptomin is really not considered a high quality pellet food -however- it seems to be a great staple for african clawed frogs. Some may disagree, but I've never heard of an ACF owner who had an issue with reptomin as a staple. It does have high protein but the phosphorus / calcium ratio is a bit poor.. I think supplementing earthworms would make up for this deficiency. May want to skip the red wrigglers and go straight for canadian nightcrawlers. For one red wrigglers are a bit less palatable (though I doubt a xenopus would care.. most frogs do) and there seems to be some talk that red wrigglers may be a bit toxic (at least to garter snakes). I'd play it safe, eventually your frogs become so large they will prefer the larger canadian nightcrawlers anyways, and if you buy from a bait store or walmart, they cost the same anyways.



    Sub-adults should be fed daily, adults should be fed 3-4 times a week. You're absolutely right, if fed daily they become quite fat. Then again it also depends on how much you feed them, if you fed them a little bit each day, that would be fine. My feeding regimen is one canadian nightcrawler each, every other day, some days I skip the earthworms and feed reptomin, so roughly 3 earthworms and 1 reptomin feeding, per week. Crickets are also given as treats, usually on reptomin days (worms make fat, stuffed frogs).



    Yes



    Yes, but be wary of plastic plants. They can easily cut the delicate webbing of their feet. Go silk or real plants.



    I would argue this site is correct. Real plants help add additional biofiltration, improve water quality, and create a more natural habitat.



    Not really. Their plant destroying prowess is a bit overrated. True nightmares to planted tanks would be turtles, goldfish, cichlids, ect...

    My ACF tank has jungle vals, bacopa, moss, water sprite, wisteria, duckweed, and frog bit and it all grows just fine they hardly if ever kick up anything.

    My best advice here and what is more beneficial for your frogs, get water sprite (indian fern, there are several varieties of this plant). Skip the fake stuff, floating plants such as this are fantastic, grow quickly, keep your nitrates under control and have some superb advantages..

    For starters floating plants have one HUGE overlooked benefit, it makes frogs less prone to escaping. They provide a general feeling of security to the frog (froggy thought: predators can't see me! I have these plants hiding me!). They give the frog the ability to bask, watch them at night, they will use water sprite to rest -- with their nose above the water. Think how nice it is for them, an aquatic air breathing animal to have the ability to rest, breathe, relax..



    I don't see why not.
    I just ordered their food. Currently I have the frog in a separate tank because I'm trying to design it more. I also understand they like to rest. I actually have black floating drainage pvc pipes. She likes to hide in there a lot. I don't know why but this frogs a bit weird... she laid eggs and does occassionally but has the black hands. She never had the black hands before but now has them(nuptial pads). I'm fairly certain their nuptial pads. I've seen them before and hers were like my last males. She was the only albino in the tank and was a female(still is since she sometimes changes to female). Is this possible?

    Anywho.

    As for the plants... I just don't want anything to get stuck in the filter and go to waste. Since this will be a sump(has to be-- personal preferance). Is there a way to make sure the plants don't get shredded and sent to the sump?

    Thanks for saving my tuckus! I was about to buy wrigglers.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    I just ordered their food. Currently I have the frog in a separate tank because I'm trying to design it more. I also understand they like to rest. I actually have black floating drainage pvc pipes. She likes to hide in there a lot.
    Sounds like that will work out fine then.

    I don't know why but this frogs a bit weird... she laid eggs and does occassionally but has the black hands. She never had the black hands before but now has them(nuptial pads). I'm fairly certain their nuptial pads. I've seen them before and hers were like my last males. She was the only albino in the tank and was a female(still is since she sometimes changes to female). Is this possible?
    I have an albino which gets 'dark hands' but is the size of a female, never seen it lay eggs though. Never seen it do a mating call or any other male behavior either though. Your guess is as good as mine, he is almost 1 year old.

    As for the plants... I just don't want anything to get stuck in the filter and go to waste. Since this will be a sump(has to be-- personal preferance). Is there a way to make sure the plants don't get shredded and sent to the sump?
    Anubias and Java Fern are 'tough' plants you can grow attached to driftwood.. they wouldn't go anywhere. Could add fast growing nitrate sucking plants to your sump/refugium. Valisineria are fast growing plants and will grow in your substrate and won't be going anywhere, they also do well in hard water which ACF also enjoy.

    Thanks for saving my tuckus! I was about to buy wrigglers.

    Seems to be enough information to lead me to think that the wrigglers aren't worth the risk, yeah.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Hi,

    I have one female with black hands as well. That doesn´t seem to be that extraordinary if she only has "dirty hands". Real nuptial pads are larger, at least my male does have black markings on his arms, too:

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    But a female looking like that would be strange indeed

    Greetings

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Felis View Post
    Hi,

    I have one female with black hands as well. That doesn´t seem to be that extraordinary if she only has "dirty hands". Real nuptial pads are larger, at least my male does have black markings on his arms, too:

    Name:  P2119081.jpg
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    But a female looking like that would be strange indeed

    Greetings
    Well I suppose my albino frog would be female then. His (her..) hands do darken but never as much as the pictures I see of male ACF online, the cloaca looks very female to me. I guess it's decided!

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    I think the cloaca is a clear sign.
    I´ve seen some females with dark hands and a few adult males without noticeable nuptial pads, but looking at the cloaca, it was always possible to determine the frog´s sex (as long as they´re old enough).

    P.S. also my male started croaking by the time his arms became black; if you didn´t hear the albino by now, I think that´s another hint

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmistr View Post


    Sounds like that will work out fine then.



    I have an albino which gets 'dark hands' but is the size of a female, never seen it lay eggs though. Never seen it do a mating call or any other male behavior either though. Your guess is as good as mine, he is almost 1 year old.



    Anubias and Java Fern are 'tough' plants you can grow attached to driftwood.. they wouldn't go anywhere. Could add fast growing nitrate sucking plants to your sump/refugium. Valisineria are fast growing plants and will grow in your substrate and won't be going anywhere, they also do well in hard water which ACF also enjoy.



    Seems to be enough information to lead me to think that the wrigglers aren't worth the risk, yeah.
    I hope to be getting myself more informed. The most I can, before I make a decision. I mean I know these frogs are "easy"(does not mean there is no care involve-- iknow that) compared to other frogs. But I want these frogs not only to "live" but to "thrive". I'm going to test out the interactions in a "fake" set up. I.e. a test run set up. Like a 30gallon (a spare I have somewhere in my house), and put in there all that stuff and a cheap filter and see what actually goes on. To see if she will rip the plants apart and I end up with a clogged filter. Or if they grow and no matter how much she "darts" (which she only does every once in a while such as turning on the lights or feeding time) That was my main concern. I know turtles would maul the plants. I just hope these frogs don't. It'd be a great addition and would help keep water quality in check. Though I do notice the water gets a bit yellow when plants are in there. And I do hope I don't have to "trim" the plants TOO much(some plants kinda grow so fast they end up "shedding" some old leaves).

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmistr View Post
    Well I suppose my albino frog would be female then. His (her..) hands do darken but never as much as the pictures I see of male ACF online, the cloaca looks very female to me. I guess it's decided!
    Same. God they like to mess with my head so much. Dx why do they do this!? I must know! I SWEAR I've seen her laid eggs, which she usually eats(guess she looses some minerals when she lays eggs)

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Umm weird thing about it is. I've heard her make "clicking" sounds a few times. Like very very rare. But she's done it.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Clicking sounds mean that she doesn´t want to be amplexed/touched. Mine do this quite regularly, also when competing for food etc.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Personally, I would stock with more frogs. I also am big with planted tanks.
    My 72 gallon had 12 (or was it 13?) frogs at one point and I might even had been tempted to squeeze a few more in.

    I had a fairly heavily planted bottom of amazon swords - tie their roots to large (half the size of your palm or so) thin flat rocks and bury in sand and they will not be uprooted. I also had a large canopy of water wisteria. I left it floating and it grew to a thickness of 6 inches at times. I turned it with my hands every other day so that all the plants got enough light to stay green and monthly I threw out or gave out bucketfuls until I had trimmed the growth by about 1/3-1/2. It grows like mad in all of my tanks.

    Looking forward to your set up - - please give lots of pictures during and after setup
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    26 Gallon Bow - ACF tank.

    20 Gallon Long - ACF tank.


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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Felis View Post
    Clicking sounds mean that she doesn´t want to be amplexed/touched. Mine do this quite regularly, also when competing for food etc.
    My apologies for the late reply(hectic week). Thank you for that bit.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenste View Post
    Personally, I would stock with more frogs. I also am big with planted tanks.
    My 72 gallon had 12 (or was it 13?) frogs at one point and I might even had been tempted to squeeze a few more in.

    I had a fairly heavily planted bottom of amazon swords - tie their roots to large (half the size of your palm or so) thin flat rocks and bury in sand and they will not be uprooted. I also had a large canopy of water wisteria. I left it floating and it grew to a thickness of 6 inches at times. I turned it with my hands every other day so that all the plants got enough light to stay green and monthly I threw out or gave out bucketfuls until I had trimmed the growth by about 1/3-1/2. It grows like mad in all of my tanks.

    Looking forward to your set up - - please give lots of pictures during and after setup
    ummm... I know this is going to sound weird. But would you perhaps take pictures on how you actually manage to tie them to something without them getting destroyed?
    If anything I'm looking for two things:

    1)Tough, very prolific surface dweller plants(ones that will provide the frogs some "rest")--- I actually like lily pads but I'm n ot sure if its possible to grow them in tanks.

    2)Any plant that is EXTREMELY tough(I.E. Doesn't rip appart easily), very durable(beginner plant basically), very easy to keep rooted(unlike anacharis and cabombas--- which I tried and I cried for a bit "not really but you get the picture") in the tank.

    I currently have TONS of fake plastic plants that go in the foreground digged under sand. I'm thinking of using some of my left over "egg" crates(basically think of like a chain fence-- but plastic of course), then tying the plants roots on it(or stalk or whatevers sturdier) then putting it in the tank first(while its without water or sand) then pour in the sand over it(so its evenly rooted)and then put the water in(add a couple flat river stones-- because I'm picky about looks to prevent it from ever floating up),

    Oh the plants leaves must be tough because if they're not--- they'll float to the filter and clog it and I would be very sad about this.

    this set up has to be a 100% mess-free. (i.e. a week or two after its cycle is done I expect it not to smell like toilet, or the water clarity is obscure, or the filters getting clogged)


    I hope this new food I'm giving it helps reduce any "mess". Because my current frog doesn't poop like a turtle would(pooping machine--- trust me even the tiniest baby turtle is still messier than an african clawed frog)

    I'd go on youtube to see some set ups. But I kinda don't trust youtube since it maybe just some "expert" claiming to know what he/she is doing and really just giving others bad tips(which is like 90% of all the animal care videos)

    I remember that it may have been you whom I thought was the african clawed frog prince/princess(not sure yet) someone here regarded as an expert on them.

    Anyways. I just hope that if I can keep 13 frogs I'd keep all types of african clawed frogs(naturals, lab, albino, rectics, piebalds, and anything out there)

    I'm to ratio it like this 1m: 2f

    So If I had to pick I'd say....

    Albino:1m 1f(they're okay but not my fav color lol)
    Natural: 2m : 4f(I'd choose these over the lab raised ones though)
    Piebalds: 3 total(kinda more fun to look at)
    Rectic: 1m: 1f(it's a bit better than albino but still)

    Total frogs: 13

    I'm hoping to get this done by the end of summer. I'm trying to think it completely through and then gather the parts piece by piece

    Their diet will consist(and currently consist)of:
    -Xenopus express' XL Adult frog pellets
    -Frozen krill or shrimp(every other feeding)
    -Earthworms(Treat day-- extra feeding day)
    -Crickets(once a month-- I'd go for roaches but.. doubt tenants would be happy on that)

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    It is very easy to do and I will see if I can hunt down any pictures of how I tied them down. I also have used two lily plants in my tanks with success. The dwarf lily (has reddish green leaves) and the common banana plant. The dwarf lily has sent lily pads all the way across the surface of my 72 bow and has survived ACF and axolotls.

    The amazon sword I cannot swear by enough. It grows in thick, shady and luscious with no work lol - my kind of plant!
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    26 Gallon Bow - ACF tank.

    20 Gallon Long - ACF tank.


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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenste View Post
    It is very easy to do and I will see if I can hunt down any pictures of how I tied them down. I also have used two lily plants in my tanks with success. The dwarf lily (has reddish green leaves) and the common banana plant. The dwarf lily has sent lily pads all the way across the surface of my 72 bow and has survived ACF and axolotls.

    The amazon sword I cannot swear by enough. It grows in thick, shady and luscious with no work lol - my kind of plant!
    what about ones meant for ponds? like the lily pads that are somewhat large.

  22. #19
    Moderator Jenste's Avatar
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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    I tried a few pond plants myself and here is where I caution you - - they need HIGH levels off ammonia to feed off of and can be highly demanding for oxygen/light/nutrients etc that cannot be met in an aquarium. I did not have success with them.

    I have had lots of success with amazon swords, dwarf lilies, banana plants, moss balls, ludwigia, and wisteria. I have never had to tinker with my tank to accommodate them and never dosed any fertilizers, chemicals, C02 etc.... Which is preferable to me as the less I have to alter in a tank, the better I feel about the tank.
    72 Gallon Bow - ACF and GF tank.
    26 Gallon Bow - ACF tank.

    20 Gallon Long - ACF tank.


    "If there were an invisible cat in that chair, the chair would look empty. But the chair does look empty; therefore there is an invisible cat in it." C.S. Lewis, Four Loves, 1958

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    OK don't laugh. I couldn't find any pictures of how I had tied down my plants and I didn't want to uproot any of my large ones right now as they are really well rooted now.

    To explain the colors (in case they aren't clear lol) The green is the plant. The gray is the rock. The browns are the roots. The pink is how I tie the thread.

    I first wrap the sewing thread around the base of the plant, right where the root system begins. Next I spread the root system and wedge the rock right up into it. I wrap half of the roots around the rock and then wrap the thread around the roots, binding them to the rock in a crisscross pattern to hold them in place. I leave about 1/3-1/2 of the roots free by the time I am done. I pull more roots down and bind them based on how the stability is feeling. Every now and then after doing a few (maybe a half dozen lashes or so) around the rock, I do a loop (or a few) around the base of the plant at the beginning of the roots and the do more crisscrosses etc.

    It is a trial by error because every rock has a different shape and texture. I personally prefer oval shaped, slightly irregular rocks as the thread can cling between the nooks and crannies.

    If my magical drawing isn't helpful let me know and tomorrow during water changes I will dig around in one of my smaller tanks for a younger plant and do a picture demonstration
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    72 Gallon Bow - ACF and GF tank.
    26 Gallon Bow - ACF tank.

    20 Gallon Long - ACF tank.


    "If there were an invisible cat in that chair, the chair would look empty. But the chair does look empty; therefore there is an invisible cat in it." C.S. Lewis, Four Loves, 1958

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