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Thread: African Clawed Frogs

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenste View Post
    I tried a few pond plants myself and here is where I caution you - - they need HIGH levels off ammonia to feed off of and can be highly demanding for oxygen/light/nutrients etc that cannot be met in an aquarium. I did not have success with them.

    I have had lots of success with amazon swords, dwarf lilies, banana plants, moss balls, ludwigia, and wisteria. I have never had to tinker with my tank to accommodate them and never dosed any fertilizers, chemicals, C02 etc.... Which is preferable to me as the less I have to alter in a tank, the better I feel about the tank.
    I guess I'd go with floating moss balls and I'll check the rest out too.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenste View Post
    OK don't laugh. I couldn't find any pictures of how I had tied down my plants and I didn't want to uproot any of my large ones right now as they are really well rooted now.

    To explain the colors (in case they aren't clear lol) The green is the plant. The gray is the rock. The browns are the roots. The pink is how I tie the thread.

    I first wrap the sewing thread around the base of the plant, right where the root system begins. Next I spread the root system and wedge the rock right up into it. I wrap half of the roots around the rock and then wrap the thread around the roots, binding them to the rock in a crisscross pattern to hold them in place. I leave about 1/3-1/2 of the roots free by the time I am done. I pull more roots down and bind them based on how the stability is feeling. Every now and then after doing a few (maybe a half dozen lashes or so) around the rock, I do a loop (or a few) around the base of the plant at the beginning of the roots and the do more crisscrosses etc.

    It is a trial by error because every rock has a different shape and texture. I personally prefer oval shaped, slightly irregular rocks as the thread can cling between the nooks and crannies.

    If my magical drawing isn't helpful let me know and tomorrow during water changes I will dig around in one of my smaller tanks for a younger plant and do a picture demonstration
    Although your drawing is magical... it's not magical enough for me to get it. These instructions I'd understand more by pictures.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Haha

    not a problem. I will do my best to get a picture tutorial put together for you this weekend. I am putting together a new tank this weekend so I will be able to do it while rearranging my plants
    72 Gallon Bow - ACF and GF tank.
    26 Gallon Bow - ACF tank.

    20 Gallon Long - ACF tank.


    "If there were an invisible cat in that chair, the chair would look empty. But the chair does look empty; therefore there is an invisible cat in it." C.S. Lewis, Four Loves, 1958

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenste View Post
    I tried a few pond plants myself and here is where I caution you - - they need HIGH levels off ammonia to feed off of and can be highly demanding for oxygen/light/nutrients etc that cannot be met in an aquarium. I did not have success with them.

    I have had lots of success with amazon swords, dwarf lilies, banana plants, moss balls, ludwigia, and wisteria. I have never had to tinker with my tank to accommodate them and never dosed any fertilizers, chemicals, C02 etc.... Which is preferable to me as the less I have to alter in a tank, the better I feel about the tank.

    Well, vallisneria americana is a pond plant that does well in my aquarium. Anubias and Java Fern are probably the de facto African Clawed Frog plants because they're rugged, but slow growers and Anubias in particular, is expensive. If anyone does Anubias I would add fast growing plants with it to suck up nitrates because slow growing and broad leafed plants like Anubias are big time algae magnets.. the shade/nutrient sucking floating plants will help it do better if grown submerged.

    All the plants you listed though work fine, though Ludwigia is a bit on the difficult side.

    My personal favorite for ACF is floating water sprite, the thin leafed variety known also as India Fern. It's a very fast grower and a nutrient sucker, sadly it's not be doing well in my tank lately.. I think adding duckweed was a mistake. Nothing sucks nutrients up quite like duckweed..

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Picture Tutorial

    I used red thread so it would be clear, but I usually use tan thread so it isn't noticeable in the aquarium.

    Step 1. Lay out plant, rock, thread, scissors.


    Step 2. Twist thread around and around the base of plant.


    Step 3. Spread roots, nestle rock up in center.


    Step 4. Wrap roots around rock.


    Step 5. Secure with thread. Crisscross thread to bind roots to rock.


    This is what the bottom of the rock looks like.



    Good luck! Hope the photos help!
    72 Gallon Bow - ACF and GF tank.
    26 Gallon Bow - ACF tank.

    20 Gallon Long - ACF tank.


    "If there were an invisible cat in that chair, the chair would look empty. But the chair does look empty; therefore there is an invisible cat in it." C.S. Lewis, Four Loves, 1958

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    In my opinion...the floating moss balls are a bit of a waste of money. It is often just a tiny bit of moss tied around a ping ball with fish thread and a weight.

    Moss also has a very low ammonia absorption rate so it won't really help with water quality.
    72 Gallon Bow - ACF and GF tank.
    26 Gallon Bow - ACF tank.

    20 Gallon Long - ACF tank.


    "If there were an invisible cat in that chair, the chair would look empty. But the chair does look empty; therefore there is an invisible cat in it." C.S. Lewis, Four Loves, 1958

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    moss is really only good for trapping little particles of food, good for shrimp tanks.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenste View Post
    Picture Tutorial

    I used red thread so it would be clear, but I usually use tan thread so it isn't noticeable in the aquarium.

    Step 1. Lay out plant, rock, thread, scissors.


    Step 2. Twist thread around and around the base of plant.


    Step 3. Spread roots, nestle rock up in center.


    Step 4. Wrap roots around rock.


    Step 5. Secure with thread. Crisscross thread to bind roots to rock.


    This is what the bottom of the rock looks like.



    Good luck! Hope the photos help!
    This should get stickied.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenste View Post
    In my opinion...the floating moss balls are a bit of a waste of money. It is often just a tiny bit of moss tied around a ping ball with fish thread and a weight.

    Moss also has a very low ammonia absorption rate so it won't really help with water quality.
    Moss would be an addition really. I know already that they trap micro particles. Which is a plus. I wouldn't really have them tied with strings(I can see that going wrong with these guys).

    I may have to buy some fast growers, and amazon swords and the such. The filter will have to be strong enough to pull out (pardon my language) all the **** from the tank without being too powerful to pretty much drag the plants into it and thus clogging it. I hope the water out put to be enough to make some movement but not enough that the frogs will be overly stressed about it. I may have to get that aquavac thing that's basically an aquarium vacuum cleaner(removes dirt from the water without doing a water change) and then that would help with the water changes too.

    Also right now because I just "felt" like it-- I went to a specific petstore I somewhat trust and bought two half grown(backlegs grown) american bullfrog tadpoles, I threw them in the tank and the frog is chasing them somewhat. Kinda wanted her to excersice a bit. :V I know someone "somewhere" said feeding frogs (or anything cold blooded really) to amphibians isn't that a good idea because it may contain parasites and the such. But these tadpoles all look healthy to begin with and were treated with salt, and a few meds(they do it to all the new livestock).

    While I hold no emotional attachment for "other" frogs because you have to remember it's sorta the cycle of life. In the wild they -would- be eating -anything- that moves in the water. Hence the lateral back(i think that's the world).

    They hunt based upon water movement and I'm not fully convinced that pellets should be all of their diet. Just adding worms and shrimp kinda isn't enough of variety. I'd give it something like crawfish but they have claws and -will- injure the frogs.

    I saw feeder fish but they're ussually infested with parasites and such. Goldfish are just horrible to feed -any- animal because they're high in fats and hormones and lack basic nutrition.


    Over all I hope to do what you showed me, and get some plants that spread around the ground. I like a plant called "baby's tear" but not sure about it.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Deku View Post
    Moss would be an addition really. I know already that they trap micro particles. Which is a plus. I wouldn't really have them tied with strings(I can see that going wrong with these guys).

    I may have to buy some fast growers, and amazon swords and the such. The filter will have to be strong enough to pull out (pardon my language) all the **** from the tank without being too powerful to pretty much drag the plants into it and thus clogging it. I hope the water out put to be enough to make some movement but not enough that the frogs will be overly stressed about it. I may have to get that aquavac thing that's basically an aquarium vacuum cleaner(removes dirt from the water without doing a water change) and then that would help with the water changes too.
    I still really recommend a canister filter for these frogs. I really like my Eheim 2217, I just broke mine down and cleaned it and yeah it was gross the filtration quality on these units is really great, theyre really quiet and they are workhorses that last for years and years and years.

    Also right now because I just "felt" like it-- I went to a specific petstore I somewhat trust and bought two half grown(backlegs grown) american bullfrog tadpoles, I threw them in the tank and the frog is chasing them somewhat. Kinda wanted her to excersice a bit. :V I know someone "somewhere" said feeding frogs (or anything cold blooded really) to amphibians isn't that a good idea because it may contain parasites and the such. But these tadpoles all look healthy to begin with and were treated with salt, and a few meds(they do it to all the new livestock).
    Can't really condone this. You're right though, in the wild Xenopus will catch and eat anything it can whenever it can. However, american bullfrogs aren't something they'd eat in nature either since they come from different continents and quite honestly I really worry about trans-amphibian diseases and parasites. It's really not something you can judge by looking at the specimen and assuming it's safe. I would also imagine that 'salt treating' the tadpoles wasn't a great idea either, I would also wager they are quite salt intolerant. I just don't see the point of this I guess, besides feeding your frogs at a very high cost..

    While I hold no emotional attachment for "other" frogs because you have to remember it's sorta the cycle of life. In the wild they -would- be eating -anything- that moves in the water. Hence the lateral back(i think that's the world).
    Mostly arthropods, worms, insect larvae, daphnia.. on seldom occasions will prey upon tadpoles (this usually happens when over crowded), small fish, mammals, even small avians. I once had a huge chart of a study where they went out and captured a bunch of wild Xenopus and flushed their stomach contents if I can find it you may want to check it out. It was very interesting (and backs my statement up).

    They hunt based upon water movement and I'm not fully convinced that pellets should be all of their diet.
    They're predators but also scavengers, will scavenge upon dead animals, matter. Pellets aren't bad for them, many frogs live a very long life on pellets alone. I know Terry feeds his reptomin exclusively and his frogs are over a decade old. If nothing else they help round the diet out.

    Just adding worms and shrimp kinda isn't enough of variety. I'd give it something like crawfish but they have claws and -will- injure the frogs.
    It's impossible to feed a captive animal a diet as diverse as it would have in the wild. Unless you plan on raising a hundred different species of arthropods.

    I have to ask but WHY crayfish? If you want to get all natural on your frogs diet why even consider this species? Xenopus are native to Sub-Sahara Africa and crawfish don't exist in Africa besides introduced/invasive species (raised for food). Shrimp contain thiaminase so I would advise against shrimp entirely.

    I saw feeder fish but they're ussually infested with parasites and such.
    Could breed live bearers or Cichlid Convict fry as long as you kept the tanks well maintained and not overstocked you could do this. But yes one sick fish and you got problems.

    Last year I bred black mollies to feed to my frogs (I was given a ton of these fish 30+ without much else to do with them) in a 55 gallon aquarium. It was more trouble than it was worth, the more I read about black mollies proved that they were a brackish/saltwater fish if you REALLY want to keep them in optimal condition. They also tend to get calamus worms when kept in softer, fresh water. I mostly fed my frogs the fry when they were juveniles and it wasn't really even fun to watch, Xenopus are nocturnal animals by nature and will simply wait for the lights to go out to begin hunting resting, placid fish. I never *saw* them once eat a fish, but they certainly did eat them over time. I once came downstairs at night for something and turned on the lights and cause one of my frogs swallowing a molly, that's about the extent of the 'entertainment' value I've gotten with live feedings.

    Another bad thing about feeder fish in my opinion is these frogs don't all have the same instinct to hunt. I have one frog who is just a predatory monster and cleaned house and another frog who is fairly indifferent. It's hard to ensure both are fed well if you just toss food in and see what happens. This is why I always feed my frogs by hand and mostly earthworms. Every frog gets fed the same in my tank. =P

    Goldfish are just horrible to feed -any- animal because they're high in fats and hormones and lack basic nutrition.
    Contain loads of thiaminase too. Though I highly doubt their fat content is really that huge of a deal, fish fat is actually oil and I would imagine a Xenopus would digest it fine. Now mammal fat.. that's different. Either way yes, goldfish are **** for feeders, they're pond fish and I wish more people realized this. Parasites, disease, and thiaminase make this species inappropriate.

    Over all I hope to do what you showed me, and get some plants that spread around the ground. I like a plant called "baby's tear" but not sure about it.
    Baby Tears are a carpeting plant, they're hard to do with clawed frogs as they tend to kick these plants up faster than they grow. They also need fertilizers, CO2, and high light and your frogs will not like any of that in their environment. I tried to grow dwarf hair grass in my tank way back, it was a waste of money and time. Xenopus kick up substrate as a defensive maneuver, they also kick up plants.

    Personally I would really like to get a 125 gallon tank and do a paludarium for my frogs some day. It would look really cool, at least.
    Last edited by mpmistr; March 23rd, 2013 at 11:44 PM.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmistr View Post
    I still really recommend a canister filter for these frogs. I really like my Eheim 2217, I just broke mine down and cleaned it and yeah it was gross the filtration quality on these units is really great, theyre really quiet and they are workhorses that last for years and years and years. Can't really condone this. You're right though, in the wild Xenopus will catch and eat anything it can whenever it can. However, american bullfrogs aren't something they'd eat in nature either since they come from different continents and quite honestly I really worry about trans-amphibian diseases and parasites. It's really not something you can judge by looking at the specimen and assuming it's safe. I would also imagine that 'salt treating' the tadpoles wasn't a great idea either, I would also wager they are quite salt intolerant. I just don't see the point of this I guess, besides feeding your frogs at a very high cost.. Mostly arthropods, worms, insect larvae, daphnia.. on seldom occasions will prey upon tadpoles (this usually happens when over crowded), small fish, mammals, even small avians. I once had a huge chart of a study where they went out and captured a bunch of wild Xenopus and flushed their stomach contents if I can find it you may want to check it out. It was very interesting (and backs my statement up). They're predators but also scavengers, will scavenge upon dead animals, matter. Pellets aren't bad for them, many frogs live a very long life on pellets alone. I know Terry feeds his reptomin exclusively and his frogs are over a decade old. If nothing else they help round the diet out. It's impossible to feed a captive animal a diet as diverse as it would have in the wild. Unless you plan on raising a hundred different species of arthropods. I have to ask but WHY crayfish? If you want to get all natural on your frogs diet why even consider this species? Xenopus are native to Sub-Sahara Africa and crawfish don't exist in Africa besides introduced/invasive species (raised for food). Shrimp contain thiaminase so I would advise against shrimp entirely. Could breed live bearers or Cichlid Convict fry as long as you kept the tanks well maintained and not overstocked you could do this. But yes one sick fish and you got problems. Last year I bred black mollies to feed to my frogs (I was given a ton of these fish 30+ without much else to do with them) in a 55 gallon aquarium. It was more trouble than it was worth, the more I read about black mollies proved that they were a brackish/saltwater fish if you REALLY want to keep them in optimal condition. They also tend to get calamus worms when kept in softer, fresh water. I mostly fed my frogs the fry when they were juveniles and it wasn't really even fun to watch, Xenopus are nocturnal animals by nature and will simply wait for the lights to go out to begin hunting resting, placid fish. I never *saw* them once eat a fish, but they certainly did eat them over time. I once came downstairs at night for something and turned on the lights and cause one of my frogs swallowing a molly, that's about the extent of the 'entertainment' value I've gotten with live feedings. Another bad thing about feeder fish in my opinion is these frogs don't all have the same instinct to hunt. I have one frog who is just a predatory monster and cleaned house and another frog who is fairly indifferent. It's hard to ensure both are fed well if you just toss food in and see what happens. This is why I always feed my frogs by hand and mostly earthworms. Every frog gets fed the same in my tank. =P Contain loads of thiaminase too. Though I highly doubt their fat content is really that huge of a deal, fish fat is actually oil and I would imagine a Xenopus would digest it fine. Now mammal fat.. that's different. Either way yes, goldfish are **** for feeders, they're pond fish and I wish more people realized this. Parasites, disease, and thiaminase make this species inappropriate. Baby Tears are a carpeting plant, they're hard to do with clawed frogs as they tend to kick these plants up faster than they grow. They also need fertilizers, CO2, and high light and your frogs will not like any of that in their environment. I tried to grow dwarf hair grass in my tank way back, it was a waste of money and time. Xenopus kick up substrate as a defensive maneuver, they also kick up plants. Personally I would really like to get a 125 gallon tank and do a paludarium for my frogs some day. It would look really cool, at least.
    I wouldn't em feeding em crayfish, or just random stuff. No I know they're sub-saharan, but I want them to get AT LEAST a very large different diet of AT LEAST 10 diff. food items. I know you shouldn't put too much thought on this because they're not human. But jeez if I was an animal and was fed 1-3 things at most I'd go crazy. I didn't even like it when my own mother gave me the same meal two days in a row. I guess I have a highly varied diet now that I'm on my own... But I wouldn't want any other living being to have to go through that. I guess it's just something that no matter how much I keep telling myself that they're just frogs and have basic thinking, and emotions isn't enough to make me feel okay at the end of the day. When I kept a snapping turtle(I was younger) and I kept it in a 250gallon aquarium(it was like 12inch) I fed it soo many different foods. I would go to my friends man made pond which he keeps in pristine condition(he eats the fish he catches sometimes), no pollutants since he's far out in the "dirt" lands(country side in your tongue). The fish feed on varied stuff. Basically I would take some of the healthiest kind, and I would bring it home quickly(alive) some would be fed as is(after the fish were treated for parasites, and bacteria-- kinda made them weak somewhat dead-- shocked state) but pretty much would see tons of tiny parasites drop to the bottom(ich rarely-- which if you have a magnifying glass are easy to see) and I would give those to the my turtle AFTER I washed them off a couple times in fresh clean water(non- chlorine of course) and the turtle would relish it. I would then take the other fish, kill it, boil it, along with crayfish, freshwater clams, and a few other inverts. I would then add them to a super strong blender(vitamix500-- industrial) and I would throw in 3 dozen crickets, half a pound of earthworms, 3 hand fulls of water plants native to their region(water cress, lily pads, anacharis, etc-- all which were boiled first for 5mins) and then I would add some kale, carrots, 1 cuttle bone, 2 tablespoons of vitamin powder. I would then hit the "puree" and this thing was soo powerful it made it into liquid very quickly(of course it dulled the blades often-- which I needed a whetstone to keep up). Then I would be making knoxx gelatin (PURE gelatine-- no additives) which I would add alot of enough to mix with the batter and that when it sets it's pretty hard(hard enough to keep the beak trimmed but not so hard it's like impossible for even a snapper to cut it). He actually liked it. I made three different kinds. Depending on the season. This was done because I researched their natural diet. They're more scavengers. Point is--- I wanted to give that kind of quality keeping to my frogs. I see that xenopus has good specimens but they condone people to keep their frogs in 1-5gallon aquariums. Which is sorta cruel. Even for an experiment. :/

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Deku View Post
    I wouldn't em feeding em crayfish, or just random stuff. No I know they're sub-saharan, but I want them to get AT LEAST a very large different diet of AT LEAST 10 diff. food items. I know you shouldn't put too much thought on this because they're not human. But jeez if I was an animal and was fed 1-3 things at most I'd go crazy. I didn't even like it when my own mother gave me the same meal two days in a row. I guess I have a highly varied diet now that I'm on my own... But I wouldn't want any other living being to have to go through that.
    Nothing wrong with variety. I feed my frogs mostly earthworms, some reptomin, some times crickets. They're plump, active and very healthy (literally get so excited during feedings they almost jump out of the tank). So I don't know if you need to find over 10 different types of food.

    They're more scavengers. Point is--- I wanted to give that kind of quality keeping to my frogs. I see that xenopus has good specimens but they condone people to keep their frogs in 1-5gallon aquariums. Which is sorta cruel. Even for an experiment. :/
    I don't like the idea of people keeping their frogs in substandard conditions either.

    There is an adult clawed frog at a LFS here in the town I just moved to and I want to buy it. She (I think) is very thin and kept in an a 55 gallon (guesstimate) with 3 large goldfish and it's a completely empty aquarium with no where to hide or explore. I can't convince them to sell it to me, said it's a display animal and refuse to sell it. They feed it goldfish (which I told them is bad). I let them know it was on the thin side and let them know that earthworms would be a much better diet but I doubt it will make much of a difference. I was kind of excited when I saw an adult clawed frog, rarely do you see them sold as adults, oh well.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmistr View Post
    Nothing wrong with variety. I feed my frogs mostly earthworms, some reptomin, some times crickets. They're plump, active and very healthy (literally get so excited during feedings they almost jump out of the tank). So I don't know if you need to find over 10 different types of food. I don't like the idea of people keeping their frogs in substandard conditions either. There is an adult clawed frog at a LFS here in the town I just moved to and I want to buy it. She (I think) is very thin and kept in an a 55 gallon (guesstimate) with 3 large goldfish and it's a completely empty aquarium with no where to hide or explore. I can't convince them to sell it to me, said it's a display animal and refuse to sell it. They feed it goldfish (which I told them is bad). I let them know it was on the thin side and let them know that earthworms would be a much better diet but I doubt it will make much of a difference. I was kind of excited when I saw an adult clawed frog, rarely do you see them sold as adults, oh well.
    I guess it's just a personal thing. Now for the frogs. You "could" keep them with LARGE goldfish as long as the frogs get food and the fish gets theirs. But that's just my opinion. These frogs are very tolerant. These frogs are faster than goldfish(goldfish are fat and slow-- owned them for 12 years).

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Deku View Post
    I guess it's just a personal thing. Now for the frogs. You "could" keep them with LARGE goldfish as long as the frogs get food and the fish gets theirs. But that's just my opinion. These frogs are very tolerant. These frogs are faster than goldfish(goldfish are fat and slow-- owned them for 12 years).
    Did not take offense to the fact the frog was housed with large goldfish. Was more bothered by the fact the frog was underweight, had no real place to hide/rest, and was fed an improper diet.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmistr View Post
    Did not take offense to the fact the frog was housed with large goldfish. Was more bothered by the fact the frog was underweight, had no real place to hide/rest, and was fed an improper diet.
    Sorry I missed that part(I was tired); yeah I'd report it to proper authorities. It's considered animal abuse.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    I'd say it's more a case of ignorance rather than abuse. Maybe I can convince them this weekend to let me buy him.

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmistr View Post
    I'd say it's more a case of ignorance rather than abuse. Maybe I can convince them this weekend to let me buy him.
    This is more of a joke-- but steal it. LOL Obv. you shouldn't but. Would be nice. Or atleast nice to just take it and leave the money on the register. Though you'd get in trouble for that.

  19. #38
    100+ Post Member mpmistr's Avatar
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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    My girlfriend actually suggested we do just that lol.. I never knew I'd become a frog smuggler..

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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by mpmistr View Post
    My girlfriend actually suggested we do just that lol.. I never knew I'd become a frog smuggler..
    or you could annoy them with PETA lolol. They wont leave em alone at ALL.

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    100+ Post Member mpmistr's Avatar
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    Default Re: African Clawed Frogs

    Quote Originally Posted by Deku View Post
    or you could annoy them with PETA lolol. They wont leave em alone at ALL.
    PETA is against the ownership of animals period, doubt they'd be much help. They have a whole page dedicated to the cruelty of aquariums.

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