• Pacific Chorus Frog

    Care of Pacific Chorus Frog - Pseudacris regilla (Baird and Girard, 1852)
    © Paul Rust - NorthWest Amphibian Rescue

    A very special thank you to Jo-Anna Brown "Jace"
    for her expertise and patience


    Taxonomy
    Family - Hylidae -Treefrogs

    Genus - Pseudacris - Chorus Frogs
    Species - regilla - Pacific Chorus Frog

    Meaning


    Pseudacris - Greek - pseudes, deceptive
    regilla
    - Latin - regal, splendid


    The Pacific Chorus Frog is commonly and incorrectly referred to as the Pacific Treefrog, Pacific Chorus Treefrog, Northwest Chorus Frog, Northern Pacific Treefrog, Sierran Treefrog, and several others which make it confusing for people trying to find care information. It is not a treefrog, it is a chorus frog, and more correctly it is the Pacific Chorus Frog! Many organizations still use the traditional name of treefrog while conceding that the vernacular doesn't have to be an accurate reflection of phylogeny.This article is intended to make the distinction for care purposes and is only for the Pacific Chorus Frog.

    RCW 1.20.150 legally designates the Pacific Chorus Frog as the official amphibian for the state of Washington.




    © Jo-Anna Brown (jace)



    Description/Housing:
    • A small frog that reaches a maximum of 2" in length.
    • Pacific Chorus Frogs can be immediately identified by the dark brown or black eye-stripe that disrupts the outline of the eye.
    • Body coloring ranges from green, tan, brown, gray, reddish and cream, but it is most often green or brown.
    • Body color and the eye stripe do not change, but the body color can quickly change from dark to light in response to environmental conditions. This change is involuntary and has to do with temperature and humidity, not background color.
    • It has round pads on the tips of the toes and small webbing between them.
    • These frogs live on the ground and in low bushes and branches so you will want a multi-leveled habitat consisting of ground area, plants, sticks, and water. They are chiefly nocturnal but often become active during the day in captivity. A 20 Gallon aquarium is both long and high enough to accommodate about 5 safely. These frogs are social and show little or no signs of aggression or territorial behavior in captivity. The males like to sit at the edge of the water and call in the evenings so a water feature 4” or so deep and about 1/3 the length of the enclosure will be appreciated by all as they like to swim also. The advertisement call is an extremely loud two part call that sounds like “crick-eck”. It is very pleasant after you get used to it.
    • If you want them to breed they prefer deeper pools up to 19” deep but I have bred them in 6” of water. The water must be filtered and have sticks and rocks in the pool for the female to attach her eggs to. Males have a dark patch on their throat that is wrinkled, this is the vocal sac. Females have a white, light colored smooth throat.
    • The top of the enclosure must be escape proof and can be half glass and half screen or all screen. These frogs can climb exceptionally well and will test the security of your setup.

    Range:
    • The Pacific Chorus Frog ranges from British Columbia, Canada to Baja California and eastward to Montana and Nevada. In Baja California it is restricted to desert oases. It is the only native frog species on the Channel Islands.
    • It is the most abundant frog within its range.

    Breeding:
    • Breeding takes place from November to July in a wide range of habitats. Provide a water area that is around 5" to 19" deep with some form of structure in the water.
    • Females will lay egg clusters on vegetation, sticks, rocks and anything they can stick them to. Clusters can contain as many as 70 eggs each.
    • Tadpoles hatch within one week and metamorphosis can take up to 2 ½ months.
    • Once the froglets emerge they will seek hiding places in the moss and vegetation and should be fed daily with fruit flies. They grow fairly fast and the adults do not prey on the young so they do not require being separated.


    © Jo-Anna Brown (jace)

    BEAUTIFUL YOUNG MALE CALLING




    © Paul Rust
    COUPLE IN AMPLEXUS




    © Paul Rust
    EGG CLUSTERS ON STICKS




    © Paul Rust
    NEWLY HATCHED 3/8" TADPOLE




    © Paul Rust
    ALMOST READY




    © Paul Rust
    FIRST DAY OUT OF THE WATER




    © Paul Rust
    3 DAYS OUT OF THE WATER



    Substrate:
    • Additive-free top soil or potting soil from a garden center or hardware store is ideal. You can use your garden's soil provided it has not had chemicals sprayed or added to it in at least 6 months.
    • Coconut fibre (sold under various brand names as a compressed brick that you soak in a bucket of water overnight to expand).
    • Regardless of what you use provide at least 2 inches. These frogs will burrow to some extent to make homes.
    • Cover the substrate with moss, leaf litter, sticks etc. This helps give them places to hide and makes them feel secure. It also keeps the substrate from sticking to them.

    Hides/Cover:
    • Hollowed out logs, seed pods, coco huts, anything they can get into or under.
    • Try to provide at least one hiding spot for each frog. Breaking up the line-of-sight from hide to hide will help them feel more secure.
    • Plants need to be sturdy and well rooted as this species will climb and jump from plant to plant and will trample and destroy frail plants.
    • Provide several long sticks that are at least as thick as the frogs are wide. They like to sit on these and sleep. They also pick out spots on them to attract mates.

    Food/Feeding:
    • These are a fairly small species and food items need to be small or medium sized.
    • Crickets should be the staple diet. Be sure and gut-load them before feeding.
    • Flightless fruit flies are a good food also and help provide something to eat between feedings.
    • Feed a couple of crickets per frog every other day or so along with 50-70 fruit flies. You don’t need to hand feed them, just drop the food into the enclosure and let the frogs hunt them.
    • A good rule of thumb is to provide food smaller than the frog’s mouth is wide.
    • Dust the food items with good quality vitamin and calcium supplements weekly.

    Temperature and Moisture:
    • This species comes from a temperate climate and can tolerate a wide range of temperatures. Keeping the enclosure between 65 and 75 degrees F seems to be a good balance.
    • Don't keep in direct sunlight.
    • Don't keep near heat sources, they don’t require additional heating.
    • If you decide not to build a pond in the enclosure then you need to provide a source of fresh clean water. A small bowl or container will work fine. It must be kept clean as they will jump in and swim in it, evacuating waste as they do so.
    • Ventilation is a must. They do not like being wet all the time. Covering half of the enclosure with a screen top and misting a few times a week is sufficient.
    • Keeping the temperature in the above mentioned range will prevent them from hibernating.
    • Provide a 12 hour photo period using lights on a timer.

    Final Notes:

    From an experienced point of view, they do not like other species of any kind in the enclosure with them. They will not lay eggs if there are fish or newts in the water feature. They can be handled for short periods of time and don’t seem to mind it. Keep in mind that they are frogs, they can and will jump a long ways and are difficult to catch when they are scared. It should be noted that Pacific Chorus Frogs have a natural immunity to the Chytrid fungus so you should always assume that they are carrying it. Do not share anything that you use for them with any other amphibians that you may have. Wash your hands before and after any contact with them. This species is very rewarding to keep and you will get many happy years of enjoyment with your Pacific Chorus Frogs.
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Pacific Chorus Frog started by Paul Rust View original post
    Comments 11 Comments
    1. Jackiemsmith's Avatar
      Jackiemsmith -
      This is such an informative article. It took me a while to figure out what kind of frog that we owned, but have figured out that they are Pacific Chorus Frogs. Found them in a mud puddle in Tehachapi, CA and they have grown into cute little frogs. I am wondering if it's ok to feed them mini mealworms?

      Thanks in advance for your help.

      Jackie
    1. LeviTheTiny's Avatar
      LeviTheTiny -
      Thank You, This will help me and my Pacific Chorus Frog Levi. And you did a really good job on the article.
    1. Gnag the nameless's Avatar
      Gnag the nameless -
      Man, my 2 male pacific chorus frogs are the little rascals of my amphibians. Croaking a riot, climbing and hopping about, these are some active frogs and are very funny to watch! One thing I really stress with these frogs is make sure you have a really secure lid. They're master escape artists, and I once forgot to tightly secure the lid. Well, before I knew it I spotted Chrome scaling the outside of my Juvenile bullfrogs tank, which is nearby my Chorus frogs tank, but you'll never guess where I found my other male: INSIDE the tank with my bullfrog! I'm lucky I saw him before my big bullfrog did, or someone could've ended up as Froggy dinner! Ever since that experience, I've been extra careful to make sure the lid for those little rascals tank is fitted on tight!
    1. Liam Bain's Avatar
      Liam Bain -
      can I have dragon gobys with these frogs
    1. Gnag the nameless's Avatar
      Gnag the nameless -
      Quote Originally Posted by Liam Bain View Post
      can I have dragon gobys with these frogs
      Best not to mix species. It's just a bad idea, as the Goby's might harm the frogs. Mixing species also causes stress between the animals.
    1. MelissaL's Avatar
      MelissaL -
      Hi Paul, if you don't mind can I ask you a question? I have two PCF's one I believe is a female, the other a male. I have only had them a few months. They have a a small water feature, maybe 4" deep. Today I found a "blob" of something in the water. It looks white. I have googled what their egg sacs look like, and this does not appear to be an egg sac. There are two rocks in the water, but this blob is just floating in there. Should I be worried? Thanks for your help.
      Melissa
    1. Liam Bain's Avatar
      Liam Bain -
      Also,Can I use those decrotive repto filters for these guys.I don't wan't them egetting in the opening at the top.
    1. Bombina Bob's Avatar
      Bombina Bob -
      Just wondering how ling these guys live, 5-10 years?
    1. Strider18's Avatar
      Strider18 -
      Quote Originally Posted by Gnag the nameless View Post
      Man, my 2 male pacific chorus frogs are the little rascals of my amphibians. Croaking a riot, climbing and hopping about, these are some active frogs and are very funny to watch! One thing I really stress with these frogs is make sure you have a really secure lid. They're master escape artists, and I once forgot to tightly secure the lid. Well, before I knew it I spotted Chrome scaling the outside of my Juvenile bullfrogs tank, which is nearby my Chorus frogs tank, but you'll never guess where I found my other male: INSIDE the tank with my bullfrog! I'm lucky I saw him before my big bullfrog did, or someone could've ended up as Froggy dinner! Ever since that experience, I've been extra careful to make sure the lid for those little rascals tank is fitted on tight!
      You definetly need a tight fitting lid for these, they can be major escape artists. But my female actually isn't to jumpy and doesn't try to escape very often unless I put food in with the lid partially off then she freaks out lol.
    1. AbranV's Avatar
      AbranV -
      Quote Originally Posted by Strider18 View Post
      You definetly need a tight fitting lid for these, they can be major escape artists. But my female actually isn't to jumpy and doesn't try to escape very often unless I put food in with the lid partially off then she freaks out lol.
      I've noticed the same with mine. As soon as I open the lid they're ready to make a run for it.

      I have a question for you all. I have two PCF's one is about three weeks out of the water, and the other is only three days out. How soon will I be able to tell if they are male or female?

      Thanks
    1. Strider18's Avatar
      Strider18 -
      Quote Originally Posted by AbranV View Post
      I've noticed the same with mine. As soon as I open the lid they're ready to make a run for it.

      I have a question for you all. I have two PCF's one is about three weeks out of the water, and the other is only three days out. How soon will I be able to tell if they are male or female?

      Thanks
      Not sure when you will be able to tell, the males start to call when theya re pretty young if I recall correctly. Either way I hope you get one of each!
  • Currently Active UsersCurrently Active Users

    There are currently 653 users online. 3 members and 650 guests

    Most users ever online was 5,910, October 16th, 2013 at 03:04 AM.

    1. AwesomePossum,
    2. catalystgenetics,
    3. Froguyz
  • Advert

  • Recent Activity

    apr0705

    American Toad weird symptoms. New owner, need help

    Thread Starter: apr0705

    Hey everyone, First of all sorry, because this post will be long. I've been a lurker on this site for quite a while now, but this will be my...

    Last Post By: KP 3 Hours Ago Go to last post
    Larry Wardog

    PA Woods and Forests Native Species

    Thread Starter: Larry Wardog

    This is an update thread on the Gray Army, the Western PA Woods and Wellsboro the Golden Toad. I will use this for now to share with you all what is...

    Last Post By: Larry Wardog 19 Hours Ago Go to last post
    DirtyBird

    Tank safe clear coat/ sealant

    Thread Starter: DirtyBird

    So ive started making a diy waterfall and lake, out of styrofoam, grout, paint etc. but i couldnt find a good acrylic sealant that is water proof,...

    Last Post By: Froguyz 17 Minutes Ago Go to last post
    Larry Wardog

    Frog Forests

    Thread Starter: Larry Wardog

    I am working on a project that will display two very different enclosures focused on two different needs for the specific animals. The direction I am...

    Last Post By: Larry Wardog 10 Hours Ago Go to last post
    Trout hunter

    toad changing colors all of a sudden help

    Thread Starter: Trout hunter

    Hi all, my male toad has all of a sudden turned to a very light shade of brown overnight, this kinda concerns me as he is normally a very dark...

    Last Post By: KP 2 Hours Ago Go to last post